Paleo Pineapple-Ginger Grilled Chicken Recipe- AIP Modification

Paleo Pineapple-Ginger Grilled Chicken Breasts Recipe by Tara Perillo grilled chicken Paleo Pineapple-Ginger Grilled Chicken Recipe- AIP Modification IMG 5749

Most of you know by now, I’m a huge fan of batch cooking.  Seriously, I have no idea how I would survive if I didn’t batch cook most of my meals.  Ever since I started keeping track of my macro ratios, I’ve switched to eating leaner cuts of meat.  My favorite lean meat is skinless, boneless chicken breasts.  But sometimes, when baking them, they can become a bit too dry and bland.  I started experimenting with different marinades and methods of cooking. Since grilling is one of my favorite methods, I purchased a small indoor grill.  It’s awesome! I get juicy, delicious, grilled chicken breasts every time.

Paleo Pineapple-Ginger Grilled Chicken Breasts Recipe by Tara Perillo grilled chicken Paleo Pineapple-Ginger Grilled Chicken Recipe- AIP Modification IMG 5749 1024x1024
Paleo Pineapple-Ginger Grilled Chicken Breasts

This marinade is the result of one of my experiments gone totally right.  Each week, I pull out my trusty indoor grill, and cook a few of these grilled chicken breasts, to eat throughout the week.  This Pineapple-Ginger Grilled Chicken makes it into the rotation quite often.

Paleo Pineapple-Ginger Grilled Chicken Recipe- AIP Modification

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 45 minutes

Yield: 4 breasts

Serving Size: 1 breast

Paleo Pineapple-Ginger Grilled Chicken Recipe- AIP Modification grilled chicken Paleo Pineapple-Ginger Grilled Chicken Recipe- AIP Modification IMG 5640

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Place all ingredients in large bowl or resealable plastic bag.
  2. Mix well.
  3. Place bowl or bag in fridge to marinate for 20 minutes to 1 hour.
  4. Prepare grill. If using and indoor grill, set temperature to 390˚ F.
  5. Place chicken breast on grill and cook until internal temperature reaches 160˚F, about 20 minutes, flipping midway through cooking.
  6. To get grill marks, flip each side with grill slats horizontal and then vertical.
  7. Remove from grill.
  8. Serve.

Notes

Chicken breasts can be stored for up to a week in the fridge.

http://www.paleocajunlady.com/paleo-pineapple-ginger-grilled-chicken-recipe-aip-modification/

I hope you enjoy my Pineapple-Ginger Grilled Chicken recipe. And, while you have your grill out, why not grill up some extra hamburger patties, veggies, or anything else that tickles your fancy. Asparagus is especially yummy when it’s grilled.  You could batch grill lots of foods for the days ahead.  I always throw on some extras!

As always, I wish you good health…….and, good food!

*This post contains affiliate links.  If you make a purchase through one of these links, I may receive compensation.  Thank you for helping to support my blogging efforts, here at Paleo Cajun Lady. – Tara Perillo

grilled chicken Paleo Pineapple-Ginger Grilled Chicken Recipe- AIP Modification fullsizeoutput 281f

Tara Perillo

Welcome all. I am Tara Perillo, herbalist, homeopath, yoga and fitness instructor, and healthy foodie . After successfully reaching remission of my lupus symptoms, through changes in my diet, exercise, and lifestyle, I wrote the ebook, Sickness To Fitness Quick Start Guide. I am also honored to have my paleo and AIP recipes featured in Paleo Magazine, Paleo Living Magazine, Shape Magazine Online, 85 Amazing AIP Breakfasts, The Paleo AIP Instant Pot Cookbook, and blogs by The Paleo Mom, Kris Kresser, Whole New Mom and many others. My focus is to help others become stronger in every facet of their lives. Join me to become stronger in health, mind, body, and spirit, together!

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
Twitter grilled chicken Paleo Pineapple-Ginger Grilled Chicken Recipe- AIP Modification twitterFacebook grilled chicken Paleo Pineapple-Ginger Grilled Chicken Recipe- AIP Modification facebookPinterest grilled chicken Paleo Pineapple-Ginger Grilled Chicken Recipe- AIP Modification pinterestGoogle Plus grilled chicken Paleo Pineapple-Ginger Grilled Chicken Recipe- AIP Modification googleplusYouTube grilled chicken Paleo Pineapple-Ginger Grilled Chicken Recipe- AIP Modification youtube

The Art Of Saying “No”

Lately, I’ve been feeling like I’m living in a giant pool, constantly treading water. You could say, I’ve bitten off more than I can chew. It seems I need to practice the art of saying “NO”.

The Art Of Saying "NO" by Tara Perillo|Paleo Cajun Lady the art of saying no The Art Of Saying “No” IMG 6496
The Art Of Saying “No”

Some of you, who are around the same age, may remember that old TV commercial, with the woman who sang about bringing home the bacon….and, frying it up it the pan….oh, and never letting him (whoever him was) forget he’s a man. Basically, they were telling us women that we could do everything and anything. We set out to build careers, families, friendships, and livelihoods. We juggled everything, and always took on more. We learned to say “Yes, I can have and do it all!”. To say “No” would have made us look weak. As empowered women, the last thing we wanted was to look soft and outdated.

The downside to saying “yes” all the time is you eventually wear yourself down. Typically, this will start to manifest itself in physical illness. I believe the surge of autoimmune disease diagnoses is partially a result of all this “yes” dominance. By saying “yes” to everything, we’ve created so much pressure and stress for ourselves. Eventually, something has got to give.

Now, I am in no way an expert in the art of saying “no”. I’m pretty much what you could call a work in progress. Slowly, I’m learning how to analyze whether a request deserves a “yes” or a “no”. And, I call it an art because most often we cannot blurt out a quick “no”. We have to carefully determine what we can fit into our already busy lives.

The Art Of Saying "NO" by Tara Perillo|Paleo Cajun Lady the art of saying no The Art Of Saying “No” IMG 6497
Overwhelmed? You may want to say “No”.

How to determine if you should accept or deny a request:

  1.  If you accept this request, will it help you as well? For example, if your boss asks you to work on a weekend, and you accept, will it help to further your career?
  2. If you decline the request, will it hurt you in any way? For example, take the instance above, and decline. Will you lose your job or lose a promotion?
  3. Do you have too much on your plate already? For example, if your Saturday is filled with shuttling the kids around, and someone asks you to run an errand for them, would you have to rearrange your whole schedule to help them?
  4. Can you negotiate the request? For example, you may not be able to run the errand above on Saturday, but you could fit it in on Sunday. Would that work for the person?

And, that’s it. If you make the process too complicated, it’ll take too long to formulate an answer. Basically, if it won’t hurt you to say “no”, or if you already have too much on your plate, you say “no”. If the request will help you greatly, will hurt you if you decline, or you can negotiate it, you may want to say “yes”. But, the choice is still yours to make.

How to gracefully tell someone “No”:

  1.  Understand that the person making the request probably has no idea how busy you already are. Don’t expect people to know your schedule. Simply explaining that your plate is full at this time is usually enough for people to understand. You don’t need to give them an itemized list of the things you’re doing. It’s just easy to say, “I would love to help you; but, I barely have time to do everything in my schedule as it is. Perhaps, I could help you at another time.”
  2. Never try to negotiate with children or fur-babies. A simple, yet firm “No” is best. LOL!
  3. If it’s a request that you just don’t want to do…..ever, it’s best to be up front and say, “No, I’m sorry. I can’’t do it.”, and smile. Most of the time we feel the need to explain; but, that’s not necessary. They’re asking for your time, service, space, or whatever. If giving them what they ask does not bring you joy, you owe no explanation.
The Art Of Saying "No" by Tara Perillo the art of saying no The Art Of Saying “No” IMG 6498
Remember to take time for yourself.

Obviously, saying “no” to some people is going to be easier than saying it to others. Family is notoriously hard to decline. But, like I constantly tell my husband, if something happens to you, or you get too sick to help others, what’s going to happen to them then. You’re no good to anyone, including yourself, if you’re overstressed, exhausted, and spread too thin. Sometimes, you just need to practice the art of saying “No”.

As always, I wish you good health……and, good food!

the art of saying no The Art Of Saying “No” fullsizeoutput 281f

Tara Perillo

Welcome all. I am Tara Perillo, herbalist, homeopath, yoga and fitness instructor, and healthy foodie . After successfully reaching remission of my lupus symptoms, through changes in my diet, exercise, and lifestyle, I wrote the ebook, Sickness To Fitness Quick Start Guide. I am also honored to have my paleo and AIP recipes featured in Paleo Magazine, Paleo Living Magazine, Shape Magazine Online, 85 Amazing AIP Breakfasts, The Paleo AIP Instant Pot Cookbook, and blogs by The Paleo Mom, Kris Kresser, Whole New Mom and many others. My focus is to help others become stronger in every facet of their lives. Join me to become stronger in health, mind, body, and spirit, together!

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
Twitter the art of saying no The Art Of Saying “No” twitterFacebook the art of saying no The Art Of Saying “No” facebookPinterest the art of saying no The Art Of Saying “No” pinterestGoogle Plus the art of saying no The Art Of Saying “No” googleplusYouTube the art of saying no The Art Of Saying “No” youtube

Do You Need Pre and Post Workout Meals On The AIP?

Those of you who follow me on Instagram or Facebook have seen me posting my pre- and post-workout meals. Many of you who have started to workout again have begun to question whether or not you should be adding extra nutrition to your diets. The answer really depends on you.

Do You Need Pre and Post Workout Meals on The AIP? by Tara Perillo pre and post workout meals Do You Need Pre and Post Workout Meals On The AIP? IMG 5541 1024x1024
Pre and Post Workout Meals on the AIP

In my research, I have found most people on the AIP are not doing the level of exercise that requires added nutrition. That is actually a good thing. If you’re working to heal an autoimmune disorder, you really shouldn’t be doing hardcore workouts too soon in your recovery. Intense workouts can actually hurt your recovery. I’m not saying that you can’t do any workouts. I’m just saying to keep it keep it steady and slow to not overtax your healing body.

It’s important to understand, I didn’t start my intense workout program until over a year of being on the AIP. At the time, I was about 98% healed. And, even I took it slow at first. Once I determined that I could handle more, I did more. I was able to complete my healing and put myself into remission. But, it took awhile to get to that point.

Do You Need Pre and Post Workout Meals on The AIP by Tara Perillo pre and post workout meals Do You Need Pre and Post Workout Meals On The AIP? IMG 5465 1024x1024
Pre and Post Workout Meals on The AIP

So, I said before that you hold the answer to whether or not you need additional nutrition before and after workouts. Most of us on the AIP are getting lots of nutrient dense foods in our diets. What I’ve seen in many of the autoimmune community is a lack of protein and an overabundance of fats in their diets. This may not be helpful if you are trying to build muscle and strength and/or lose fat. If that is your goal, you will want to up your protein and cut a bit of the fats out of your diets. However, because your workouts are not intense, you do not need to add a huge amount of protein right after your workout. A simple meal of chicken breast (4 ounces), half a sweet potato, and a small salad of greens is perfect, up to two hours after your workout. As far as pre-workout foods, if you’re eating breakfast before your workout, that should be enough to get you through your workout. When eating before a workout, I usually try to have a little protein and a fruit. The fruit can help to give you the energy to power through just about any workout. Turkey patties with blueberries added in is one of my favorite pre-workout foods.

Now, if you’re doing more endurance type workouts, like running or hiking, you’re going to want to up your carbs (for energy) and protein (to prevent muscle loss) after workouts. Some people prefer to do endurance or cardio workouts on an empty stomach. I wouldn’t recommend this on the AIP. You’re probably already fighting against lagging energy levels. Why add to your burden? Instead, I would recommend a small pre-workout meal of a small amount of protein, carb, and fats. Maybe you could have 1/3 of a sweet potato, a slice of turkey and a banana. You can keep it light; but, do eat something.

Post Workout Nutrition by Tara Perillo pre and post workout meals Do You Need Pre and Post Workout Meals On The AIP? IMG 5338 1024x1024
Post Workout Nutrition- half a sweet potato, asparagus, and fish

These are obviously quickie guidelines for you to follow. Next year, I’ll be rolling out full fitness coaching programs exclusively for those of us with autoimmunity. Fitness nutrition (pre and post workout meals) is very personalized. Each person is different. Those of us with autoimmune disease need special attention and direction. That’s what I’m going to provide for you.

In this post, I’ve added photos of some of my favorite AIP post-workout meals for you to duplicate. Most of my pre-workout meals have reintroduced foods. I’ll be doing another post covering reintroducing foods for fitness. Just remember to keep your pre-workout nutrition simple and light.

I know many of you will have questions. You can leave them in the Comments or email me.

As always, I wish you good health……and, good food!

pre and post workout meals Do You Need Pre and Post Workout Meals On The AIP? fullsizeoutput 281f

Tara Perillo

Welcome all. I am Tara Perillo, herbalist, homeopath, yoga and fitness instructor, and healthy foodie . After successfully reaching remission of my lupus symptoms, through changes in my diet, exercise, and lifestyle, I wrote the ebook, Sickness To Fitness Quick Start Guide. I am also honored to have my paleo and AIP recipes featured in Paleo Magazine, Paleo Living Magazine, Shape Magazine Online, 85 Amazing AIP Breakfasts, The Paleo AIP Instant Pot Cookbook, and blogs by The Paleo Mom, Kris Kresser, Whole New Mom and many others. My focus is to help others become stronger in every facet of their lives. Join me to become stronger in health, mind, body, and spirit, together!

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
Twitter pre and post workout meals Do You Need Pre and Post Workout Meals On The AIP? twitterFacebook pre and post workout meals Do You Need Pre and Post Workout Meals On The AIP? facebookPinterest pre and post workout meals Do You Need Pre and Post Workout Meals On The AIP? pinterestGoogle Plus pre and post workout meals Do You Need Pre and Post Workout Meals On The AIP? googleplusYouTube pre and post workout meals Do You Need Pre and Post Workout Meals On The AIP? youtube